ROBOTS SCULPTORS IN ITALY

Carving with pinpoint precision, and at least with much of the artistic prowess of its more celebrated predecessors, ABB2, a 13-foot zinc alloy robotic arm, extended its rotating flat joint and diamond-coated finger into a gleaming piece of White marble. Slowly and steadily, ABB2 polished the stone block, tracing the contours of the soaked cabbage leaves for a sculpture designed and commissioned by a famous Yankee artist. ABB2 is a lonely robotic genius who works in anthropomorphic solitude. Quantek2 was rubbing a block of alternate marble, executing a sculpture planned by a British artist who had hired a robotic hand as a guide, just a few feet away, in a building crowded with robots.

Since the Renaissance, the ingenious production of Italian creative workshops has been one of the nation’s best-known and most valued exports. The founders and workers of this artificial intelligence laboratory imagine that capturing superior ability is the only technique to create certain that the state remains on the creative forefront. Michele Basaldella a well-known technician also known as the robot mind commented, “We don’t need another Michelangelo.” Carrara machines are now the ones working behind the scenes.

Several of the artists who use them demand that their identities be kept secret. “Artists have to put up with this concept that they keep chipping with a hammer,” said Giacomo Massari, one of the many founders of Robotor, the company that owns the sculpting robots. Massari, 37, argued that abandoning typical hand-stitching methods was the only technique to change Italian marble sculpture to survive and thrive. Carrara’s prosperity has long depended on the charm of its marble for artists.

Throughout the city’s growing Renaissance years, sculptors roamed the surrounding quarries for weeks to come up with the right piece of marble for their representational masterpiece. In the 18th century, Carrara marble was transformed into a pile of neoclassical sculptures, and dozens of workshops opened here. However, among artists in vogue and up to this point, Carrara marble fell out of favor, translucent stone, gray in color, became the stuff of bathroom floors, room counters, and monuments. observance. Due to the time it takes to build a statue by hand, numerous artists have abandoned marble as a material, according to Massari.

And fewer and fewer young people in Carrara are willing to do the work of chipping the stone, which does not involve the consumption of dust and all the other dangers to well-being that come with it. In a mountain warehouse, where technicians are testing a great new robot, Mr. Massari pointed to a replica of “Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss,” a masterpiece of neoclassical sculpture. Massari named as “more and more insane” commissions, they began to build their own terrible machines with a homemade software program and German elements. Basaldella, the technician, stated that many of his former colleagues from his design school have been howling sculptors, but they did not stand out, because the manual dexterity of the guides is simply not new or in demand.